International

Audubon’s International Focus

How Audubon links together conservation work across the Americas

Wilson Plover. Photo: Walker Golder/Audubon

Audubon’s International Focus

How Audubon links together conservation work across the Americas

Our hemispheric network of 18 BirdLife International Partners and others with whom we work in nine countries throughout the Americas coupled with 22 state programs, 464 chapters and 41 Audubon centers in the United States, provides the foundation for achieving real and enduring conservation results at the scale necessary for birds to survive into the future. By focusing the conservation of shared species on their key wintering and migration areas in Latin America and the Caribbean and on their breeding areas in the United States and Canada, our network can achieve the conservation of these species over their entire life cycle.

Presently, Audubon works in 30 IBA’s in 9 countries: the Bahamas, Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Colombia, Paraguay and Chile. Our goal is to improve the conservation of 10 million acres of habitat that encompasses at least 100 key IBA’s in Latin America and the Caribbean. To achieve enduring concrete results, Audubon’s work is based on:

  1. Building strong and effective partnerships with local conservation organizations and supporting them in taking concrete on-the-ground conservation actions based on our shared goals around local contexts and specific conservation threats; and helping strengthen their technical, operational and strategic capacity to carry out effective conservation actions in their countries over the coming decades.
  2. Bringing to these partnerships expertise in institutional strengthening, bird-based science, sustainable economic activities, community engagement, education, advocacy and high-level policy development to help achieve conservation success in the region.

The International Alliances Program carries out its work in line with Audubon’s five main conservation strategies, described in our 2012-15 strategic plan, that are crucial to tackling the key issues facing birds across the Americas.