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Extinct Boids

EXTINCT BOIDS

This superbly quirky new book features unique interpretations of birds lost forever, and those only imagined.

 

Hatched from the imaginations of filmmaker Ceri Levi and illustrator Ralph Steadman are creatures such as this one, the Nasty Tern.

Photo: Illustration by Ralph Steadman
EXTINCT BOIDS

This superbly quirky new book features unique interpretations of birds lost forever, and those only imagined.

 

The Dodo, a large, flightless bird that resided in Mauritius, was driven to extinction in the mid to late 1600s by hunting and pigs depredating nests. The "blue slut" crouching beneath the Dodo only ever existed as a work of art.

Photo: Illustration by Ralph Steadman

EXTINCT BOIDS

This superbly quirky new book features unique interpretations of birds lost forever, and those only imagined.

 

The fictional Long-legged Shortwing.

Photo: Illustration by Ralph Steadman

EXTINCT BOIDS

This superbly quirky new book features unique interpretations of birds lost forever, and those only imagined.

 

The Jamaican Red Macaw was presumably hunted to extinction toward the end of the 18th century; the last specimen, taken in 1765, was lost long ago.

Photo: Illustration by Ralph Steadman

EXTINCT BOIDS

This superbly quirky new book features unique interpretations of birds lost forever, and those only imagined.

 

The imaginary Moor Pen is a "an uncontrollable and panic-riddled creature" that distrusts boids, particularly the powerful Needless Smut. Rumor has it that the Smut put the kybosh on the Moor Pen's application to be a librarian.

 

Photo: Illustration by Ralph Steadman

EXTINCT BOIDS

This superbly quirky new book features unique interpretations of birds lost forever, and those only imagined.

 

It's thought that the St. Helena Giant Hoopoe was driven to extinction by hunting soon after the island was discovered in 1502.

Photo: Illustration by Ralph Steadman

EXTINCT BOIDS

This superbly quirky new book features unique interpretations of birds lost forever, and those only imagined.

 

The Double-banded Argus may or may not have existed. The only evidence is one feather belonging to the supposed creature, but it's likely just an aberrant feather from a normal argus pheasant.

Photo: Illustration by Ralph Steadman

EXTINCT BOIDS

This superbly quirky new book features unique interpretations of birds lost forever, and those only imagined.

 

Another of the artists' zany creations, the Rodrigues Blue-black Throstle.

Photo: Illustration by Ralph Steadman