1 of 7

The Human Face of Climate Change

THE HUMAN FACE OF CLIMATE CHANGE A new book of portraits reveals how global warming affects us all.   Juliana Pacco Pacco, llama herdswoman. Paru Paru, Peru. In the Peruvian Andes, temperatures are rising, precipitation patterns changing, and some of the world's highest ice fields are melting. Locals have shifted their potato crop, plagued by heat-related diseases, to higher ground. Photo: Photograph by Mathias Braschler and Monika Fischer

THE HUMAN FACE OF CLIMATE CHANGE

A new book of portraits reveals how global warming affects us all.

 

Michael Fischer, dairy farmer. Meningie West, South Australia, Australia.

Larges areas of Australia have undergone an unusually severe drought for more than a decade, resulting

in the devastating Victoria bushfire in 2009 and severe agricultural losses in the Murray Basin.

Photo: Photograph by Mathias Braschler and Monika Fischer

THE HUMAN FACE OF CLIMATE CHANGE

A new book of portraits reveals how global warming affects us all.

 

Yang Gengbao and his wife, Huang Lianfeng, shop owners and flood victims. Hongse, Guangxi, China.

Throughout history, the valleys and deltas of Southern China have been buffeted by floods. In recent

years,these have grown more intense. The couple pictured here lost their home to a flood. 

Photo: Photograph by Mathias Braschler and Monika Fischer

THE HUMAN FACE OF CLIMATE CHANGE

A new book of portraits reveals how global warming affects us all.

 

Gouro Modi, cow herdsman, with his sone, Dao. Korientzé, Mali.

"Our homes are far from here," Gouro Modi says in The Human Face of Climate Change, "We left because there

was not enough rain. We follow the pastures. We go where there is water. It used to rain a lot, but not now."

Photo: Photograph by Mathias Braschler and Monika Fischer

THE HUMAN FACE OF CLIMATE CHANGE

A new book of portraits reveals how global warming affects us all.

 

Sandy Adam, Inuvialuit whaler and hunter. Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest Territories, Canada.

"You can see how much the land has eroded. The beach used to be a thousand feet over there," says Sandy Adams.

"Underneath us is just permafrost, and it is all going to melt away. As soon as it gets any warmer we will sink."

Photo: Photograph by Mathias Braschler and Monika Fischer

The Human Face of Climate Change

Restart Slideshow