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Taking a Stand

The 115,000-acre Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, the winter home of most of the only self-sustaining wild population of whooping cranes.

Photo: Photograph by Blake Gordon

The whooper’s black primary feathers are unmistakable, but they aren’t visible when its wings are folded.

Photo: Photograph by Blake Gordon

For centuries the cranes have wintered in the Aransas Refuge, though the habitat has changed over time—in part to benefit these ancient birds, as with this manmade island.

Photo: Photograph by Blake Gordon
Photo: Photograph by Blake Gordon

Two cranes used the managed wetlands on the Myrtle
Foester-Whitmire tract in the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge all winter.

Photo: Photograph by Blake Gordon

A whooper in the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge moves with a smooth, stately elegance, giving the appearance of effortless gliding, its legs straight, its head and neck erect.

Photo: Photograph by Blake Gordon
Photo: Photograph by Blake Gordon
Photo: Photograph by Blake Gordon

Taking a Stand

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