1 of 8

The Night Stalkers

Eastern Tent Caterpillar Moth (Malacosoma americanum) - Lac Bonin, Quebec - July 1, 2008

Tent caterpillars, like the luna, lack a mouth; they eat and drink only in the caterpillar phase. After hatching from the cocoon, their sole purpose in life is to mate and produce eggs before they die. 

Photo: Photograph by Jim des Rivieres

Luna Moth (Actias luna, male) - Crosby, Ontario - June 7, 2004

The eerie luna moth belongs to the giant silk moth family. With a 4- to 5-inch wingspan, it is one of the biggest and most celebrated moths in North America. 

Photo: Photograph by Jim des Rivieres

Virginian Tiger Moth (Spilosoma virginica) - Lac Bonin, Quebec - May 23, 2007

Furry scales along the moths' bodies help these cold-blooded animals retain heat when temperatures dip.

Photo: Photograph by Jim des Rivieres

Bedstraw Sphinx (Hyles gallii) - White Lake, Ontario - June 20, 2003

The bedstraw hawk moth, with a 2.5-inch wingspan and a short, stout body, is one of the sportsters in the moth world. Some hawk moths can fly up to 30 miles per hour. 

Photo: Photograph by Jim des Rivieres

Leconte's Haploa (Haploa lecontei) - Lac Bonin, Quebec - July 11, 2008

Leconte's Haploa, a tiger moth, about an inch long, is shown in its natural resting position, revealing its yellowish-orange head and the Appaloosa-like patterning on its wings. 

Photo: Photograph by Jim des Rivieres

Great Tiger Moth (Arctia caja americana) - Camp Fortune, Quebec - August 9, 2004

The appearance of species in the tiger moth family varies widely, from the colorful great tiger moth, with a 2-inch wingspan, to the slightly smaller white Virginian tiger moth. 

Photo: Photograph by Jim des Rivieres

The Night Stalkers

Restart Slideshow