Press Room

Solar Tariffs Would Slow the Adoption of Clean Energy We Need

Carbon pollution threatens birds and people—making solar panels more expensive is not a solution.

WASHINGTON — “The future will be powered by clean energy. Imposing a tariff on solar panels only slows progress, hurting people and birds in the meantime,” said Matthew Anderson, VP of Audubon’s Climate Initiative, in response to the International Trade Commission’s recommendation to impose tariffs or similar measures on imported solar panels.

“Hundreds of America’s bird species could disappear by the end of this century if we don’t act on climate and reduce carbon pollution. Instead of punishing solar customers, the White House should embrace renewable energy and the path forward it provides to a stable climate.”

In 2014, Audubon published its Birds and Climate Change Report. The study shows that more than half of the bird species in North America could lose at least half of their current ranges by 2080 due to rising temperatures. These species include the Bald Eagle, the American Kestreland the Bullock’s Oriole. Given the urgent threat climate change poses to birds and people, Audubon supports common-sense, bipartisan solutions that reduce carbon pollution at the speed and scale necessary.

To learn more about Audubon’s Climate Initiative, including how members and supporters can take steps to help birds in a changing climate, please visit www.audubon.org/climate. To read about solar options in your state and why solar energy is good for birds, please click here.

The National Audubon Society protects birds and the places they need, today and tomorrow, throughout the Americas using science, advocacy, education and on-the-ground conservation. Audubon's state programs, nature centers, chapters and partners have an unparalleled wingspan that reaches millions of people each year to inform, inspire and unite diverse communities in conservation action. Since 1905, Audubon's vision has been a world in which people and wildlife thrive. Audubon is a nonprofit conservation organization. Learn more how to help at www.audubon.organd follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @audubonsociety.

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Contact: Nicolas Gonzalez, ngonzalez@audubon.org, (212) 979-3068.

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