Scientists' Warnings About Global Warming Grow More Dire

Published: Apr 6, 2007
New York, NY - 
Statement of Audubon President John Flicker in response to the April 6 report of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change:

"This latest report from the world's scientists sounds an alarm too dire for anyone to ignore. America and the world must act immediately to reduce global warming emissions to avoid the worst of the consequences it predicts.



"Like the storied 'canary in the coal mine,' birds and other wildlife have always alerted us to perils that threaten us all. The report makes clear that impacts already observed or predicted in the wild pose very serious threats to us all. It leaves no doubt that global warming threatens everything people and wildlife depend on for survival and quality of life—our air, water and food supplies, even the very places we live.



"Taking strong personal and political action now is our best hope for helping to save people and wildlife from hunger, thirst, disease and dislocation. While the report's warning is dire, it should prompt determination and not despair. There is much we can do to effect the long-term implications for people and nature around the globe. There has never been a louder or clearer call to action to curb global warming.



"Hopefully this scientific wake up call will strengthen the growing congressional momentum toward reducing and capping the greenhouse gas pollution that fuels the report's dire predictions. There is still time to make a difference—the world's best scientists are telling us we must use it wisely."

With members, chapters, and state offices across the United States, Audubon has long worked on conservation measures that reduce the impact of global warming pollution, safeguarding birds, other wildlife, people and the planet we share. Audubon is now redoubling efforts to engage Americans in individual, community and legislative actions that will cut global warming pollution by the 2% per year scientists say is needed to avoid the worst consequences.

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The National Audubon Society saves birds and their habitats throughout the Americas using science, advocacy, education and on-the-ground conservation. Audubon's state programs, nature centers, chapters and partners have an unparalleled wingspan that reaches millions of people each year to inform, inspire and unite diverse communities in conservation action. Since 1905, Audubon's vision has been a world in which people and wildlife thrive. Audubon is a nonprofit conservation organization. Learn more at www.audubon.org and @audubonsociety.

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