1 of 12

Climate Change Hits Home

Along the Outer Banks, a one-meter rise in the Atlantic is all but certain by 2100.

Crews work to repair man-made sand dunes on along NC 12 on Pea Island in the Outer Banks, NC. Photo: Greg Kahn.
Sand piles up along homes on Seagull St. in Rodanthe, NC. A recent Nor'easter brought 16-foot waves, flooding roads and leaving several feet of sand to dig out from. According to Dr. Stanley Riggs, this area is the fastest eroding on the Outer Banks. Photo: Greg Kahn
Brian Winnett, left, hauls in a blue fish near a stretch of condemned homes on the beach in Nags Head to fish on the Outer Banks, NC. Photo: Greg Kahn
Dr. Stanley Riggs of Eastern Carolina University, has been studying the Outer Banks of North Carolina for many years, often battling locals and government officials on how to protect the islands from further damage. Photo: Greg Kahn
Flooding remains days after a storm on N Tower Circle in Buxton, NC. Photo: Greg Kahn
Stephanie O'Neal, works at the Sea Sound Motel in Rodanthe on the Outer Banks, NC. Photo: Greg Kahn
Dr. Reide Corbett, Coastal Processes Interim Co Program Head at UNC Coastal Studies Institute lives and works on the Outer Banks. Photo: Greg Kahn
Fidel Sanchez dumps a wheelbarrel full of sand onto a growing pile as he and other workers try to clear out the Cape Hatteras Motel in Hatteras, NC. The motel, located on the beach, not only had several feet of sand in the stairwells, but in the parking lot behind the building. Photo: Greg Kahn
Ernie Foster, who lives in Hatteras, runs the Albatross Fleet, a deep-sea fishing business on the Outer Banks. Foster's family can be traced back several generations in Hatteras. Photo: Greg Kahn
Grave markers at the Salvo Campground Cemetery in Salvo, NC, are slowly making their way into the Pamlico Sound. Photo: Greg Kahn

Climate Change Hits Home

Along the Outer Banks, a one-meter rise in the Atlantic is all but certain by 2100.

Restart Slideshow