Deveaux Bank is a small barrier island at the mouth of the North Edisto River estuary. It is composed of open beach, dune field and tidal mudflats. It is a major colonial nesting area for seabirds as well as an important foraging and loafing area for shorebirds.
The website is https://www.dnr.sc.gov/mlands/managedland?p_id=216

Ornithological Summary

The preserve provides nesting, roosting and foraging habitat for a variety of sea and shore birds. Beginning in the mid-1980?s, thousands of eastern brown pelicans, several species of terns, black skimmers, laughing gulls, two species of herons and other incidental species successfully nested on Devaux Bank every year. From the late 1980?s to 1994, the island supported the largest number of nesting eastern brown pelicans in the range of the species.

The preserve is a sandspit island formed by deposits from the Edisto River System. It shifts in position and structure due to erosion and deposition of sand. Devaux Bank supports colonies of nesting waterbirds because of its isolated nature and lack of mammalian predators.

Conservation Issues

Although the island is posted, boaters with their unleashed pets pose a major threat to
nesting seabirds. They step directly on the nests, crushing eggs, and disturb the birds so that they are off their nests long enough for the sun to damage the eggs.
The shifiting sands accrete and erode over the years. At times Devaux Bank has been completely submerged.
Hurricanes pose a threat.

Ownership

Devaux Bank is owned by the state of SC under the Heritage Preserve Program.

Habitat

Devaux Bank Heritage Preserve encompasses approximately 25 acres at the mouth of the North Edisto River in Charleston County . The size of this preserve varies and may sometimes disappear entirely. The preserve is a sandspit island formed by deposits from the Edisto River system. The island is dynamic and shifts in position and structure due to erosion and deposition of sand. Two plant communities exist on the preserve: intertidal beach and maritime grasslands. The intertidal beach community consists of shifting sand beaches and regularly-flooded mud flats. If present, vegetation is sparse and consists of smooth cord grass, glasswort, marsh hay and sea purslane.

The maritime grassland community consists of unstable sand dunes elevated above the highest flood mark. This community is dominated by Russian thistle and marsh hay, which grow along with camphorweed, beach elder, beach tea and dog fennel.

Land Use

Devaux Bank is protected under the SC Department of Natural Resources Heritage Preserve Program.
Seabird research is done there.