This IBA includes the flood control reservoir (William H. Harsha Lake), associated recreation facilities, and non-developed park lands. It lies within the Little Miami River Basin. The drainage patterns and topography have been determined by glaciation. Associated habitats include mature deciduous forest, swamp forests, wet meadow, steep ravines, early successional forests, shrub/scrub, and old fields.

Ornithological Summary

Several high-priority birds regularly use this site for breeding, migration, and/or wintering. It holds large numbers of waterfowl when lakes further north become frozen. This lake rarely freezes. It holds large numbers of gulls for roosting. It may have the highest concentration of Pied-billed Grebes in the state in winter and also regularly holds significant numbers of loons (e.g. Pied-billed Grebe 40 max. daily; Common Loon 200 max. daily). It holds large numbers of gulls for roosting. It may have the highest concentration of Pied-billed Grebes in the state in winter. Both migratory and breeding landbirds use the park, which functions as a vagrant trap (i.e. Sooty Tern, Western Grebe, Little Gull, jaeger spp.)

Conservation Issues

Recreation/fishing/hunting is regulated in selected areas of park and also in non-developed areas. Development of recreation facilities is a potential threat. Breeding Bird and other surveys have been conducted to locate sensitive areas. Urban sprawl has impact on the immediate area surrounding the park. An abandoned toxic waste dump is located off-site in the watershed and upstream from the reservoir. Water testing monitors water quality.

Ownership

Owner: David Zagurny, Park Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2185 Slade Road, Batavia, OH 45103; Charles Clark, Park Manager, East Fork State Park, P.O. Box 119, Bethel, OH, 45106-0119

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