This area, one of the first nominated during the early years of the IBA program, encompasses a narrow, partially-developed strip along the coast west of Santa Barbara. It may be divided into the following major areas:

Devereux Slough (UC Santa Barbara)
Goleta Slough (Santa Barbara Co. Parks, City of Santa Barbara, UC Santa Barbara)
Campus Lagoon (UC Santa Barbara)
More Mesa/Ellwood Mesa (Private)
Atascadero and Maria Ygnacio Creek (Santa Barbara Co.; So. Calif. Gas Co.)
Lake Los Carneros (Private; City of Goleta Parks)
Goleta Point/Coal Oil Point (UC Santa Barbara)

More and Ellwood mesas are two sizable patches of remnant coastal grassland, with patches of Coast Live Oak woodland and riparian vegetation. Atascadero and Maria Ygnacio creeks are channelized streams with mud bottoms, which support a narrow strip of riparian vegetation (mostly willow). Lake Los Carneros is a small, cattail-rimmed lake with some riparian vegetation on the west side of Goleta, north of Hwy. 101. Goleta Slough is a true tidal wetland essentially separating UC Santa Barbara from Santa Barbara Municipal Airport and Hwy. 101. South of Goleta Slough is Campus Lagoon, a salt-water-filled pond on the UCSB campus, and to its east is Devereux Slough, another tidal wetland.

Updated by Santa Barbara Audubon, June 2008

Ornithological Summary

Coal Oil Point/Devereux Slough is a major southern California wintering area for Snowy Plover (up to 400 birds in winter) and host to locally significant numbers of migrant and wintering waterfowl, shorebirds, gulls and terns. Since 2001, a breeding population of about 15 pairs of Snowy Plover has been established through beach protection and restoration (D. Chirman, via email) The California Least Tern has successfully nested in the same protected beach area. Devereux is also the northernmost outpost of Belding's Savannah Sparrow in the world. Nearby Goleta Slough supports a much larger population of this taxon (at least 69 pr. in 1992, DC) and similar usage by migrant and wintering waterbirds. Numerous species of raptors utilize the grassland surrounding the slough. More Mesa supports a communal roost of White-tailed Kite (a few stay to breed), and a handful of Burrowing and Short-eared owls and Northern Harrier continue to winter here (and, less frequently, at nearby Ellwood Mesa). Atascadero and Maria Ygnacio creeks are notable for the high number of migrants they support, particularly during September and October, which are monitored by a long-term banding program. Lake Los Carneros is also one of a handful of breeding locales on the coast of California for Least Bittern. Finally, Coal Oil and Goleta Points appear to be very important resting points for northbound rocky-shore shorebirds (notably Surfbird), and tens of thousands of migrant inshore seabirds (loons, scoters, phalaropes, etc.) stream north just offshore during March and April. Though not as important for birds, several vernal pool complexes exist in the flat grassland between Hwy. 101 and Isla Vista.

Help us learn more about the birds at this IBA! Enter your birding data online at Calfornia eBird! (http://ebird.org/california/)

Ownership

Description: This area, one of the first nominated during the early years of the IBA program, encompasses a narrow, partially-developed strip along the coast west of Santa Barbara. It may be divided into the following major areas:

? Devereux Slough (UC Santa Barbara)
? Goleta Slough (Santa Barbara Co. Parks, City of Santa Barbara, UC Santa Barbara)
? Campus Lagoon (UC Santa Barbara)
? More Mesa/Ellwood Mesa (Private)
? Atascadero and Maria Ygnacio Creek (Santa Barbara Co.; So. Calif. Gas Co.)
? Lake Los Carneros (Private; Santa Barbara Co. Parks)
? Goleta Point/Coal Oil Point (UC Santa Barbara)

Habitat

More and Ellwood mesas are two sizable patches of remnant coastal grassland, with patches of Coast Live Oak woodland and riparian vegetation west of the community of Isla Vista. Atascadero and Maria Ygnacio creeks are channelized streams with mud bottoms, which support a narrow strip of riparian vegetation (mostly willow). Lake Los Carneros is a small, cattail-rimmed pond with some riparian vegetation on the west side of Goleta, north of Hwy. 101. Goleta Slough is a true tidal wetland essentially separating UC Santa Barbara from Santa Barbara Municipal Airport and Hwy. 101. Moving west from Goleta Slough is Campus Lagoon, a salt-water-filled pond on the UCSB campus, and to its east is Devereux Slough, another tidal wetland.

Forested Upland Evergreen Forest Other : Coast Live Oak

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