<strong>The area includes several large prairie lakes and Slade
National Wildlife Refuge about 2 miles south of Dawson in south-central North
Dakota within the Prairie Pothole Region of the glaciated plains.&nbsp;&nbsp; The refuge received its name from a Northern
Pacific Railroad executive, G. T. Slade, who donated the property to the US
Fish and Wildlife Service in 1941.&nbsp; The
refuge comprises about 3,000 acres of gently rolling prairie dotted with
prairie pothole basins.&nbsp; Most of the
grasslands on the refuge were previously under agriculture production but were
planted to various mixes of non-native grasses.&nbsp;
There have been recent efforts to restore these grasslands with native
grasses and forbs.&nbsp; The administration of
Slade National Wildlife Refuge is included under the Long Lake National
Wildlife Refuge Complex.&nbsp;</strong>

Ownership

<strong>The
area includes lands owned by county, state, and federal agencies as well as
private landowners. &nbsp;A recreational area
managed by the Kidder County Park Board lies just south of the entrance to the
refuge.&nbsp; The administration of Slade
National Wildlife Refuge is included under the Long Lake National Wildlife
Refuge Complex of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.&nbsp;</strong>

Land Use

<strong>Slade National
Wildlife Refuge is managed using prescribed fire, grazing, haying, and planting
of native grasses on previously farmed fields. Sizable infestations of invasive
exotic grasses and forbs, primarily leafy spurge, are managed through a variety
of biological and chemical means. &nbsp;Other
activities include hunting, photography, and wildlife observation (including
birding).</strong>

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