Located on more than 1000 acres of marsh and upland hardwood forest where the Little Otter Creek drains into Lake Champlain, Little Otter Creek WMA is an excellent example of a freshwater marsh ecosystem. Managed by the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife this area supports a number of Vermont Natural Community types including Cattail and Deep Broadleaf Marsh, Buttonbush Swamp and Lakeside Floodplain forest

Birds-
Little Otter Creek WMA serves as critical habitat for a wide variety of birds including several threatened and endgangered species. A breeding site for state endangered Osprey, Little Otter Creek WMA also contains a substantial acerage of the full range of emergent, freshwater marshland habitats, which provide habitat for significant breeding populations of Pied-billed Grebe (S2), Common Moorhen (S2), Least Bittern (S2), Virginia Rail, Sora (S2), and American Bittern (S3). State threatened Black Terns have nested here in recent years and Barn Owl (S1), Black-crowned Night Heron (S1), American Coot, and Nothern Harrier (S2) occur here as well. The site has also produced sightings of species on the brink of extirpation, including the Sedge Wren in 1998 and Loggerhead Shrike in 1997.

Conservation-
This site is protected and managed for wildlife by the state. Osprey platforms have been erected and annual marshbird surveys are conducted through the Vermont Marshbird Monitoring Program. Threats include invasive species such as reed canary grass and pollution primarily from agricultural runoff.

Ornithological Summary

Little Otter Creek WMA serves as critical habitat for a wide variety of birds including several threatened and endgangered species. A breeding site for state endangered Osprey, Little Otter Creek WMA also contains a substantial acerage of the full range of emergent, freshwater marshland habitats, which provide habitat for significant breeding populations of Pied-billed Grebe (S2), Common Moorhen (S2), Least Bittern (S2), Virginia Rail, Sora (S2), and American Bittern (S3). State threatened Black Terns have nested here in recent years and Barn Owl (S1), Black-crowned Night Heron (S1), American Coot, and Nothern Harrier (S2) occur here as well. The site has also produced sightings of species on the brink of extirpation, including the Sedge Wren in 1998 and Loggerhead Shrike in 1997.

Conservation Issues

Invasive species, pollution

Ownership

State

Habitat

Located on more than 1000 acres of marsh and upland hardwood forest where the Little Otter Creek drains into Lake Champlain, Little Otter Creek WMA is an excellent example of a freshwater marsh ecosystem. Managed by the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife this area supports a number of Vermont Natural Community types including Cattail and Deep Broadleaf Marsh, Buttonbush Swamp and Lakeside Floodplain forest.

Birds
Little Otter Creek WMA serves as critical habitat for a wide variety of birds including several threatened and endgangered species. A breeding site for state endangered Osprey, Little Otter Creek WMA also contains a substantial acerage of the full range of emergent, freshwater marshland habitats, which provide habitat for significant breeding populations of Pied-billed Grebe (S2), Common Moorhen (S2), Least Bittern (S2), Virginia Rail, Sora (S2), and American Bittern (S3). State threatened Black Terns have nested here in recent years and Barn Owl (S1), Black-crowned Night Heron (S1), American Coot, and Nothern Harrier (S2) occur here as well. The site has also produced sightings of species on the brink of extirpation, including the Sedge Wren in 1998 and Loggerhead Shrike in 1997.

Conservation
This site is protected and managed for wildlife by the state. Osprey platforms have been erected and annual marshbird surveys are conducted through the Vermont Marshbird Monitoring Program. Threats include invasive species such as reed canary grass and pollution primarily from agricultural runoff.

Land Use

Wildlife conservation, hunting/fishing

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