Mahannah Wildlife Management Area is comprised of early successional reforestation and managed wet fields and ponds. Extensive reforestation can be found across much of the area outside the main levee along side a large waterfowl sanctuary. Within the levee, which is occassionally flooded extensively, is farmed with soybeans while many moist soil ponds have recently been created for use by waterfowl.

Ornithological Summary

Flooded fields provide good looks at wintering Mallard, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Canvasback, Lesser Scaup, Blue-wing Teal, Green-wing Teal, Northern Shoveler, Wood Duck, Canada Goose, and Northern Pintail. Rarely Tundra Swans show up. In winter the young reforested fields have Sedge Wrens and Le Conte?s Sparrows (rare). Breeding birds include Painted Buntings and Wild Turkeys. Scissor-tailed Flycatchers are rare fall migrants.

Conservation Issues

Mahannah Wildlife Management Area was purchased by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as mitigation for damages caused by the construction of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway. It is now owned and managed by the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks. The lowest and most frequently flooded portion of the area is bottomland hardwood forest. Much of the higher ground has been planted with hardwood trees to reestablish the forest that was cleared for agriculture. Areas of intermediate elevation are mostly farmed and flooded in the winter to provide waterfowl habitat. Various water control structures regulate flooding, but about half of the area is subject to uncontrolled ?natural? flooding. The water regime of the Delta has been completely changed, so it is difficult to tell what is natural. In any case, the site manager does not control the ?natural? flooding.

Habitat

The lowest and most frequently flooded portion of the area is bottomland hardwood forest. Much of the higher ground has been planted with hardwood trees to reestablish the forest that was cleared for agriculture. Some of the heavily flooded portions of the management area are cultivated during the growing season, primarily with soybeans. Other areas of intermediate elevation are mostly farmed and flooded in the winter to provide waterfowl habitat.

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