Pronounced Sy-add, this IBA refers to a 1700-acre section of the Klamath River canyon in extreme northern California that extends for about 10 miles along Hwy. 96 (State of Jefferson Scenic Byway). This broad, isolated valley lies about 30 linear miles west of I-5 and features mature riparian woodland dominated by willow, alder and Broadleaf Maple, with a dense, jungle-like understory. The land ownership here is a complex mixture of public lands (USFS Klamath National Forest, incl. a small Bald Eagle Management Area) and private parcels.

Ornithological Summary

Within the overwhelmingly coniferous landscape of the Klamath Mountains, this habitat concentrates both breeding species and migrants. The Seiad Valley and surrounding highlands support a rich breeding avifauna with the characteristic montane species. Several of these nesters breed principally in the mountains above the valley floor, utilizing deep coniferous forests and extensive forb-dominated grasslands (mountain prairies) and willow thickets (e.g. Sharp-shinned Hawk, Willow Flycatcher). This IBA is notable for being a relatively broad valley that seems to collect large numbers of migrant songbirds during spring and fall, especially riparian-breeding taxa. The Klamath Bird Observatory of Ashland, Oregon has conducted long-term bird research here for several years.

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Conservation Issues

Though no pressing Conservation issues have come up in the valley, the legacy of clear-cutting and summer grazing has seriously altered aspects of the bird community, most notably contributing to an abundance of Brown-headed Cowbirds, historically absent from the region (B. Claypole, pers. comm.).

Ownership

The land ownership here is a complex mixture of public lands (USFS ? Klamath National Forest, incl. a small ?Bald Eagle Management Area?) and private parcels.

Habitat

This broad, isolated valley features mature riparian woodland dominated by willow, alder and Broadleaf Maple, with a dense, jungle-like understory. Within the overwhelmingly coniferous landscape of the Klamath Mountains, this habitat concentrates both breeding species and migrants. Several of these nesters breed principally in the mountains above the valley floor, utilizing deep coniferous forests and extensive forb-dominated grasslands (?mountain prairies?) and willow thickets.

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