Birding

How to Deal With Birding FOMO

How to Deal With Birding FOMO

— It’s been a week since I missed out on the Kirtland’s Warbler that strayed into Manhattan. I’m still not over it.
The Canadian Rockies Are Overflowing With Hybrid Birds

The Canadian Rockies Are Overflowing With Hybrid Birds

— A history of glaciers and warm spells has turned the region into a special place where species and subspecies mate.
A Movement to Make Birding More Inclusive and Accessible

A Movement to Make Birding More Inclusive and Accessible

— Virginia Rose found her passion for birds—and a new purpose in life—from the seat of her wheelchair. With Birdability, she's working to bring birding's benefits to others like her.
Birdist Rule #59: Learn to Identify Warblers From Below

Birdist Rule #59: Learn to Identify Warblers From Below

— The underside is what you spend the most time looking at, after all.
A Birder's Dream Job: International Flight Attendant

A Birder's Dream Job: International Flight Attendant

— Chris Done crisscrosses the globe for a career, seeking out birds wherever he lands.
Can You Recognize the Call of a Great Horned Owl?

Can You Recognize the Call of a Great Horned Owl?

— It's as distinctive as those big ear tufts.
Acid-Covered Caterpillars Are a Delicacy for Migrating Swainson's Hawks

Acid-Covered Caterpillars Are a Delicacy for Migrating Swainson's Hawks

— Each spring, thousands of the ravenous raptors descend on California's Anza-Borrego desert to gorge themselves on a buffet of moth larvae.
Which Birds Produce the Most Hybrids?

Which Birds Produce the Most Hybrids?

— Here are the three groups you should pay especially close attention to.
How a Small Home in Arizona Became a Global Birding Destination

How a Small Home in Arizona Became a Global Birding Destination

— Once somebody's backyard, Tucson Audubon's Paton Center for Hummingbirds attracts thousands of birders every year.
Now Resurgent, Ospreys Once Faced an Uncertain Future

Now Resurgent, Ospreys Once Faced an Uncertain Future

— The “fish hawk” is an early sign of spring—and a conservation ideal.