Conservation

Working Lands

A male Greater Sage-Grouse. Photo: Joel Sartore

Working lands represent one of the best hopes for conservation. These parcels of forests, ranches, and farms add up to roughly a billion acres—or about half the land in the entire Lower 48 states. Audubon collaborates with landowners, land managers, government agencies, and private industry across the hemisphere to increase the quality of habitat on privately managed lands to benefit 20 flagship bird species. Audubon also helps landowners and land managers apply bird-friendly practices on their lands and develop market-based solutions to build economic incentives that have the potential to engage many more landowners. And Audubon works on federal policies that substantially influence the management of land to advance large-scale solutions that benefit both landowners and the environment.  

Theory of Change

We will focus on four landscapes dominated by private lands and where birds and habitat are most threatened: California’s Central Valley; the sagebrush ecosystem of the interior West; North American grasslands, including the Chihuahuan Desert; and eastern forests. Audubon will help landowners and land managers apply bird-friendly practices, and drive market-based solutions that influence ecosystem health at scale. 

How to Get There

Audubon will:

Measurable Goals

  • Increase or stabilize the popula- tions of 20 flagship bird species by reducing threats in four pri- ority landscapes, thus benefiting bird species throughout the Western Hemisphere.
  • Continue Audubon’s leadership role with 11 states, multiple federal agencies, and thousands of private-sector stakeholders to implement Greater Sage- Grouse recovery plans. These plans will now cover 67 million acres; successful implementation will protect more than 350 additional species.
  • Increase the acreage of working lands in bird-friendly manage- ment programs by 500,000 acres per year.
  • Increase by 10 percent the amount of public and private funding available to private landowners to adopt bird-friendly land-management practices.
  • Through active outreach and technical assistance, engage 10,000 land managers in bird-friendly land management. 

Where We Work

The Fight for the Greater Sage-Grouse

The Fight for the Greater Sage-Grouse

One Bird, 11 States, 165 Million Acres—How Audubon Helped Protect the Sagebrush’s Most Iconic Resident.

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Arctic Slope

Arctic Slope

Audubon Alaska is pursuing permanent wilderness designation for the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

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Eastern Grasslands & Shrublands

Eastern Grasslands & Shrublands

Creating a network of protected private and public lands

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Eastern Forests

Eastern Forests

Full-lifecycle conservation for seven priority species along the Atlantic Flyway

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Grassland Birds

Grassland Birds

Developing market-based management of dwindling prairie habitat that benefits birds and ranchers alike

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Sagebrush Ecosystem

Sagebrush Ecosystem

Balancing prairie-bird protection with our nation’s need for energy

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Tongass National Forest

Tongass National Forest

Protecting some of the world's last remaining temperate rainforest

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California Working Lands

California Working Lands

California’s Central Valley is one of this country’s most important food-producing areas, and a critical habitat for many birds

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