Adult. Photo: Dan Kristiansen/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND-2.0)

The name "Common Sandpiper" is appropriate only in the Old World; in North America this is a rare bird, occurring in small numbers in western Alaska during migration. This is the Eurasian counterpart to our Spotted Sandpiper, with a similar teetering action as it walks along the edges of streams and ponds.
Family Sandpipers
The name "Common Sandpiper" is appropriate only in the Old World; in North America this is a rare bird, occurring in small numbers in western Alaska during migration. This is the Eurasian counterpart to our Spotted Sandpiper, with a similar teetering action as it walks along the edges of streams and ponds.

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Illustration © David Allen Sibley.
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Text © Kenn Kaufman, adapted from
Lives of North American Birds

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Songs and Calls

A high-pitched, piping twee-wee-wee.
Audio © Lang Elliott, Bob McGuire, Kevin Colver, Martyn Stewart and others.
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