Adult. Photo: Brandon Trentler/Flickr (CC-BY-2.0)

This Mexican specialty is similar to our American Robin in appearance, but is much more elusive, hiding in woods or dense thickets. First found in our area in 1960, it recently has become almost an annual visitor. Practically every winter, one or two are found somewhere in southern Arizona; strays also have reached Texas, New Mexico, and California.
Family Thrushes
This Mexican specialty is similar to our American Robin in appearance, but is much more elusive, hiding in woods or dense thickets. First found in our area in 1960, it recently has become almost an annual visitor. Practically every winter, one or two are found somewhere in southern Arizona; strays also have reached Texas, New Mexico, and California.

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Illustration © David Allen Sibley.
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Text © Kenn Kaufman, adapted from
Lives of North American Birds

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Songs and Calls

Song a series of rich, burry, warbled phrases, reminiscent of American Robin. Calls include a loud, descending, sibilant sssiiuu, a low tuk note (often in series), and a high, thin, lispy si in fligh
Audio © Lang Elliott, Bob McGuire, Kevin Colver, Martyn Stewart and others.
Learn more about this sound collection.

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