Poster Sessions

Submit a proposal and learn about confirmed posters

Submit a Poster Session Proposal

You are invited to submit a poster session proposal for the 2019 Audubon Convention! The convention program will feature high-quality interactive sessions that build the capacity of leaders within the Audubon network. This is your opportunity to share your expertise with Audubon’s broad and diverse community. We welcome proposals from all.

Click here to learn more and to submit a proposal.

We can accommodate a maximum of 50 posters. The deadline to submit a poster session proposal is Friday, June 14 or until we reach our maximum capacity – whichever is sooner. 

The following posters will be displayed throughout the Welcome Reception on Friday, July 26.

SD City College/Audubon Hummingbird and Butterfly Gardens

  • San Diego Community College students created Hummingbird and Monarch butterfly friendly garden spaces on four vegetated areas on campus, doing work parties to plant native vegetation. Then, a student hourly employee and students in Physical Geography and Biology classes monitored the migrating and resident Hummingbirds, birds and butterflies and used the California Audubon Society GIS website "Hummingbirds at Home" to participate in a real-life research effort. They also created a map of the campus with their 2 year-long data to analyze whether or not birds have preferred one patch to another. These patches are separated by buildings and streets, so preference may be noticed, and may lead to further study. Over a 2-year period, data was analyzed for hummingbird habitat preference and presented to the campus at large as well as to many outreach venues.
  • Presenters
    • Lisa Chaddock, Faculty Advisor, San Diego City College Audubon
    • Christian Ayala, President, San Diego City College Audubon
    • Missael Corro-Flores, Vice President, San Diego City College Audubon

Capture/Recapture: Reviving a Thirty-year Banding Tradition on the Alabama Gulf Coast

  • This poster will provide participants with a first-hand look at how Birmingham Audubon revived a beloved, but recently lapsed, banding tradition on Alabama's Fort Morgan Peninsula. It will discuss details of the event's deep history (stretching back thirty years) and its scientific significance, as well as the challenges of stepping into "someone else's shoes," managing expectations and partners, and maximizing the event's outreach potential to engage new audiences with the beauty of migratory birds.
  • Presenter
    • Emma Rhodes, Coastal Assistant Biologist, Birmingham Audubon Society

Habitat House Calls- Bring Conservation Home

  • "Bring Conservation Home" was initiated in 2012 by St. Louis Audubon as a habitat consultation and certification service for individual landowners. Since then, over 1,000 landscapes have been enrolled, representing over 500 acres of potential new habitat! Through intensive, personal contact the program inspires individuals to see their residential, work, religious and institutional landscapes as opportunities to create attractive and functional habitat spaces, improve their communities and connect with nature. In addition to the consultation and certification visits, the program has expanded to include native landscaping workshops, the installation of demonstration gardens, an annual garden tour, and native plant expo.
  • Presenter
    • Herb Huebner, Board Member and Habitat Advisor, St. Louis Audubon Society

How our Chapter Jump-Started an Effective Advocacy Program

  • Last year, the Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society developed a strategic Advocacy Plan to direct our chapter’s work in support of Audubon’s mission. What started as a simple, yet powerful, idea to boost our advocacy efforts, has blossomed into a fully-fledged, effective program with measurable impacts. Chapter leaders reached out to the Audubon community for assistance and we have sent several “Advocacy Alerts” on various local, state and federal issues impacting birds, which successfully solicited emails and comments to public officials. We have also met with elected officials, hosted them on bird walks, participated in Audubon North Carolina’s Lobby Days, and received an Audubon in Action grant to start college chapters and provide training for new advocates.
  • Presenters
    • Nancy Casey, Board Member, Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society
    • Tom Tribble, President, Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society

Understanding Riparian Birds through Community Science: the Audubon Western Rivers Bird Count

  • Learn about the Audubon Western Rives Bird Count, a community science activity designed to increase our understanding of how increased aridity and decreasing flows on the Colorado River and other rivers in the southwest are impacting riparian birds. We will describe the count, what we’ve learned so far, and how you can participate in the count itself or as an advocate for rivers.
  • Presenters
    • Chad Wilsey, Vice President of Conservation Science, National Audubon Society
    • Tim Meehan, Quantitative Ecologist, National Audubon Society
    • Desiree Loggins, Network Action Manager, National Audubon Society

Screech-owls in the Community

  • Grand Valley Audubon's Western Screech-owl project boasts more than 20 years of increasing success. Not only does the Grand Valley CBC typically lead the nation in counting this small owl; the project has been instrumental in increasing community outreach and providing positive visibility for Audubon.
  • Presenters
    • Nic Korte, Conservation Chair, Grand Valley Audubon Society

Audubon Conservation Ranching Range Ecologist Program

  • Grassland birds thrive in intact heterogeneous grassland ecosystems. However, to date, 47% of the Great Plains has been lost to conversion, primarily crop production. To combat grassland habitat loss and degradation, The Audubon Conservation Ranching (ACR) Program provides ranchers with market incentives to implement grassland bird friendly management practices on their intact rangelands. The Range Ecologist Program facilitates rancher enrollment in the ACR program by providing technical assistance to ensure program protocol compliance, designing management strategies that encourage quality grassland bird habitat, and connecting enrolled ranchers with new market opportunities.
  • Presenters
    • Joshua Lefers, Senior Range Ecologist, Audubon Dakota
    • Cody Grewing, Range Ecologist, Audubon Dakota
    • Lucy Love, Range Technician, Audubon Dakota

GIS at Audubon -- What's so spatial about maps?

  • This poster will detail the GIS resources that are readily available to the Audubon network and the ways that mapping can be used to great effect, no matter your audience or experience level.
  • Presenters
    • Ryan Hobbs, Enterprise GIS Support Technician, National Audubon Society
    • Doss Dingli, Director of Enterprise GIS, National Audubon Society

A Rare Bird: Using GIS to Protect Yuma Ridgway's Rail

  • This poster will discuss the role of GIS in the Yuma Ridgway's Rail habitat in the Southwest. The project utilizes GIS in multiple ways including mobile data collection, habitat suitability modeling with geospatial data, and various maps.
  • Presenters
    • Ryan Hobbs, Enterprise GIS Support Technician, National Audubon Society
    • Doss Dingli, Director of Enterprise GIS, National Audubon Society

Community Science: Bridging the Gap Between Birders and Research

  • Birders have become an essential part of Schlitz Audubon Nature Center’s Community Science Program. We will explain how historical data has been used, how we are utilizing birding volunteers for current community science projects and how we are actively recruiting new birding volunteers to further our research and conservation efforts.
  • Presenters
    • Corinne Palmer, Citizen Science Coordinator, Schlitz Audubon Nature Center
    • Drew Shuster, Resource Ecologist, Schlitz Audubon Nature Center

Connecting Students with Birds and Nature

  • This poster features classroom activities that teach elementary students about birds, nature, and the outdoors. These activities include a John James Audubon & Charley Harper graphic arts mash up, animated animal research posters, a QR code scavenger hunt, bird sounds poetry, and resources from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.
  • Presenter
    • Erin Murtaugh, Volunteer, Red Rock Audubon Society

Building the Flock: Workshops Strengthen Networking among Chapters and Affiliates in Ohio

  • There has been a 50% decline Audubon chapter activity in Ohio since 2006. To prevent further declines, and to bolster remaining chapters, the Council of Ohio Audubon Chapters is leading the way in revitalizing and supporting local chapters through a series of workshops and monthly conference calls. Workshops offer opportunities to discuss fundraising opportunities, membership recruitment, program opportunities, habitat conservation initiatives, and networking among chapters and other like-minded organizations. Please stop by to chat with me about why you might want to start a similar program in your state!
  • Presenter
    • Jackie Augustine, President of the Council of Ohio Audubon Chapters and Executive Board Member of Tri-Moraine Audubon Society

Lights Out Buckeyes – Factors Influencing Avian Window Collisions

  • Migratory songbirds migrate primarily at night to avoid dangers present during the day. Artificial lighting disrupts this natural phenomenon by disorienting and drawing in birds that migrate through urban landscapes on their journey to and from their breeding grounds each spring and fall. In the United States, between 365 to 988 million birds are killed in window collisions each year. With a team of undergraduates I am conducting research to pinpoint exactly when, where, and why these collisions are happening. My team of researchers consists of students in the Ornithology Club at Ohio State. We monitored most buildings on The Ohio State University main campus for window collision birds. Our findings will hopefully inform and promote future university management decisions to mitigate window collisions on our college campus and other urban areas. In addition, this research will expand our knowledge of factors causing wildlife collisions and will lead to other Universities to follow in our footsteps.
  • Presenter
    • Kandace Glanville, Board Member, Columbus Audubon Society

Audubon Mural Project - Rockford, IL

  • The Audubon Mural Project - Rockford is a public art project featuring birds that have identified by the National Audubon’s Birds and Climate Change Report. According to that report, climate change will impact 314 species of birds by 2080. This project originated in NYC, but is being brought to Rockford by Sinnissippi Audubon in collaboration with Gitler & ___. Climate change is one of the most critical challenges facing our world and the artistic movement to confront climate change has steadily gained momentum. Art can serve as a powerful tool to increase awareness and beautify our city!
  • Presenter
    • Jennifer Kuroda, President, Sinnissippi Audubon Society

FLC Makerspace Bird Box: Bridging the Gap Between Ornithology and Engineering

  • Folsom Lake College Makerspace and I have collaborated to design and create a prototype of a “Bird Box.” This box will aide not only in the housing of injured birds during transport, but also as support for ornithologists as they conduct bird field studies. The necessary knowledge was gathered through an Ornithology class as well as communicating regularly with wildlife rescues and bird biologists. The box was created utilizing sketches, 3D Printers and various materials. The box will have the ability to maintain proper positioning of the bird, optimum temperature, and a dark relaxing environment; all necessary to increase bird survival.
  • Nicole Shuman, Member, Sacramento Audubon Society
  • Presenter
    • Nicole Shuman, Member, Sacramento Audubon Society

Birds & Airport Safety: Project SOAR (Snowy Owl Airport Rescue)

  • Our primary goal is to discuss and teach others about Project SOAR (Snowy Owl Airport Rescue) whose mission is to rescue and relocate climate-threatened Snowy Owls and other raptors from airports where they pose as safety hazards. We will tell the story of how our two local Wisconsin Audubon chapters developed a successful strategy and built lasting relationships with falconers and airports. We will then teach others how they can adopt similar strategies in their hometowns. During the 2017-2018 winter, our falconers captured and relocated 4.3% of the Snowy Owls found in the entire state of Wisconsin!
  • Presenters
    • Erin Giese, President, Northeastern Wisconsin Audubon Society
    • Frank Ujazdowski, Lead Falconer for Project SOAR and Member of the Wisconsin Falconers Association
    • Janet Wissink, President, Winnebago Audubon Society

Reading a Birds Mind with GIS: Utilizing Technology as a Conservation Tool

  • This poster will analyze the role of GIS in developing predictive models that can guide habitat management and species recovery. Utilizing GIS applications like Survey123 can automate traditional monitoring methods and provide more concise recovery metrics for at risk species such as Western Snowy Plover and California Least Terns.  
  • Presenter
    • Kaitlyn O'Dea, President, California State University Channel Islands Audubon

Magnetoreception in Migratory Birds: A Research Opportunity for Underrepresented College Students

  • In a summer research program at SUNY Geneseo, biology, biochemistry, and chemistry students are pursuing an interdisciplinary project to prepare and study synthetic models of cryptochromes—enzymes found in the retinas of migratory birds that are believed to enable birds to perceive the Earth’s magnetic field. This introductory research program funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s McNair Scholars Program aims to strengthen and diversify the scientific workforce. Participants include first-generation and low-income students and members of underrepresented groups who are interested in pursuing graduate degrees in science, technology, and engineering.
  • Presenters
    • Brandon Tate, Board Member, Genesee Valley Audubon Society
    • Emmeline Gromme, Board Member, Genesee Valley Audubon Society

Annual Midwest Crane Count: Four Decades of Citizen Science

  • Since 1976, the Annual Midwest Crane Count has grown from a single-county survey to an effort that encompasses nearly 100 counties in Wisconsin and portions of surrounding states. The survey was first established to gain a better understanding of the small, but growing, Sandhill Crane population in southcentral Wisconsin. Today, over 1,200 volunteers document the abundance, distribution and dispersal of cranes on the landscape, while promoting awareness of wetland and crane conservation. We will share a summary of historic data and volunteer participation, along with lessons learned from over four decades of coordinating a citizen science project.
  • Presenters
    • Sara Gavney Moore, Digital Communications Specialist, International Crane Foundation
    • Dorn Moore, Geospatial and Information Services Manager, International Crane Foundation

Bird-window Collisions

  • 365 million to one billion birds collide with sheet glass every year in the USA alone. The facts, the why's, and the ways to reduce and prevent this unwanted mortality.
  • Presenters
    • Peter Saenger, President, Lehigh Valley Audubon Society
    • Leigh Altadonna, President, Wyncote Audubon Society
“The views expressed in user comments do not reflect the views of Audubon. Audubon does not participate in political campaigns, nor do we support or oppose candidates.”
×