Science

These Birds of Prey Have Eyes in the Backs of Their Heads

These Birds of Prey Have Eyes in the Backs of Their Heads

— With feathers that look like eye spots, some falcons, hawks, and owls are always watching.
Lead Ammo, the Top Threat to Condors, Is Now Outlawed in California

Lead Ammo, the Top Threat to Condors, Is Now Outlawed in California

— Bullet fragments routinely poison California Condors. With cooperation from hunters, the ban could be a turning point for the endangered icons.
Female Cerulean Warblers Chirp Away at Birdsong Stereotypes

Female Cerulean Warblers Chirp Away at Birdsong Stereotypes

— Though females of this species aren't known to sing, that didn’t stop two in Indiana from belting out new tunes.
Did Neanderthals Catch and Kill Golden Eagles for Their Feathers and Talons?

Did Neanderthals Catch and Kill Golden Eagles for Their Feathers and Talons?

— New evidence suggests that the ancient hominids held raptors in high esteem—and might have even passed that practice to us.
Saving Colombia's Forests Is Crucial to Protect Prothonotary Warblers

Saving Colombia's Forests Is Crucial to Protect Prothonotary Warblers

— A new study shows that almost the entire population winters in a region with rampant deforestation—a finding that could help target conservation.
Overcrowding Might be Driving Bald Eagles to Nest on Beaches

Overcrowding Might be Driving Bald Eagles to Nest on Beaches

— On the Virginia Barrier Islands, five ground nests have been found in the past six years—something never before seen on the East Coast.
Exotic Parrot Colonies Are Flourishing Across the Country

Exotic Parrot Colonies Are Flourishing Across the Country

— From Los Angeles to Miami, feral parrots have become a common sight. Are they invasive pests, or a conservation boon?
A Treasure Trove of 40,000 Bird Specimens Brought to Light

A Treasure Trove of 40,000 Bird Specimens Brought to Light

— Alongside experts, students are working at the American Museum of Natural History to sort and organize data from the longest ornithological voyage in history.
Exhausted Birds Become Lunch Meat for Tiger Sharks in the Gulf of Mexico

Exhausted Birds Become Lunch Meat for Tiger Sharks in the Gulf of Mexico

— New research shows that these apex predators wait for food to fall out of the sky during migration.
Thanks To Climate Change, Canada Jays May Eat Freezer-Burned Food All Winter

Thanks To Climate Change, Canada Jays May Eat Freezer-Burned Food All Winter

— The birds' critical food stores, saved up each autumn for lean times later, risk going bad as global temperatures warm.
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