Science

Saving Colombia's Forests Is Crucial to Protect Prothonotary Warblers

Saving Colombia's Forests Is Crucial to Protect Prothonotary Warblers

— A new study shows that almost the entire population winters in a region with rampant deforestation—a finding that could help target conservation.
Overcrowding Might be Driving Bald Eagles to Nest on Beaches

Overcrowding Might be Driving Bald Eagles to Nest on Beaches

— On the Virginia Barrier Islands, five ground nests have been found in the past six years—something never before seen on the East Coast.
Exotic Parrot Colonies Are Flourishing Across the Country

Exotic Parrot Colonies Are Flourishing Across the Country

— From Los Angeles to Miami, feral parrots have become a common sight. Are they invasive pests, or a conservation boon?
A Treasure Trove of 40,000 Bird Specimens Brought to Light

A Treasure Trove of 40,000 Bird Specimens Brought to Light

— Alongside experts, students are working at the American Museum of Natural History to sort and organize data from the longest ornithological voyage in history.
Exhausted Birds Become Lunch Meat for Tiger Sharks in the Gulf of Mexico

Exhausted Birds Become Lunch Meat for Tiger Sharks in the Gulf of Mexico

— New research shows that these apex predators wait for food to fall out of the sky during migration.
Thanks To Climate Change, Canada Jays May Eat Freezer-Burned Food All Winter

Thanks To Climate Change, Canada Jays May Eat Freezer-Burned Food All Winter

— The birds' critical food stores, saved up each autumn for lean times later, risk going bad as global temperatures warm.
Do You Know the Other Way Birds Migrate?

Do You Know the Other Way Birds Migrate?

— Some species change locales by merely moving between higher and lower elevations. Here are four examples of altitudinal migrants in the U.S.
Sooty Tern Vomit Tells a Worrisome Story

Sooty Tern Vomit Tells a Worrisome Story

— Populations of the seabird on Ascension Island have plummeted since the 1950s. A disrupted food chain could be to blame, scientists say.
Did Crows Actually Make These Gifts for the Human Who Feeds Them?

Did Crows Actually Make These Gifts for the Human Who Feeds Them?

— The corvid brainiacs are known to leave trinkets behind, but scientists caution against reading too much into their motives.
Here’s Why Birds Rub Their Beaks on Stuff

Here’s Why Birds Rub Their Beaks on Stuff

— There’s more to this behavior than meets the eye. Some of it meets the nose.
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