Sparkling Violetear Dorian Anderson

Colombia

Protecting birds in South America

Birds of Colombia

Colombia is one of the world's “megadiverse” countries, hosting close to 10% of the planet's biodiversity. In 2013, Colombia became the first country to record a landmark 1,900 species of birds—a figure that continues to increase every year. The country has nearly 20 percent of the world's total avian species, including 200 migratory species, 87 threatened birds, and 78 endemics. Colombia’s diverse geographies include important sites for Audubon’s coastal and forest priority species such as the Canada Warbler, Cerulean Warbler, Golden-winged Warbler, Prothonotary Warbler, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Western Sandpiper, Reddish Egret, and Least Tern. By focusing on key coastal and forested sites in the country, we can help conserve essential wintering grounds for these species.

Like other countries that birds depend on in Latin America, Colombia has dynamic social, economic, and political conditions. The recent end of the country’s 52-year civil war presents both conservation opportunities and challenges. In this decade Colombia has more than doubled its national conserved area—from 13 million hectares to 28.4 million hectares—an extraordinary achievement. But to meet promises that peace will bring prosperity, the Colombian government is under intense pressure to prioritize economic development.

In some Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) the end of fighting has set off a reverse exodus as hundreds of thousands of people return to recolonize the rural areas from which they fled. Agriculture, forestry, and mining are increasing and are already threatening essential bird habitats. The region is also struggling with issues related to the impacts of climate change, such as water and food security.

 

A Comprehensive Conservation Strategy

The protection of birds that use the flyways of the Western Hemisphere is at the heart of Audubon’s Strategic Plan. Our goal is to establish 500,000 acres of new protected areas in Colombia, and improve management of an additional 3.6 million acres of bird habitat across priority forest, coastal, and wetland ecosystems that support priority species. We intend to accomplish this goal via the following initiatives:

1. Conservation Action and Collaboration: In Colombia we are supporting the establishment of new IBAs and protected areas totaling 500,000 acres that include Pacific mangroves and eastern Andes tropical montane forest. Audubon has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Colombia’s National Park Service to collaborate in the areas of biodiversity conservation, climate change, ecotourism, environmental interpretation, monitoring, community outreach and education, project formulation, and fundraising. Audubon is working with the Colombian government and other partners to incorporate conservation of migratory, endemic, and endangered birds into the management of six parks totaling 3.6 million acres:

  • Farallones de Cali National Park
  • Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta National Park
  • Los Flamencos Sanctuary
  • Chingaza National Park
  • Los Nevados National Park
  • Otún Quimbaya Sanctuary

2. Tourism: Throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, Audubon has teamed with partners to develop bird-focused ecotourism as a way of conserving the habitats birds need most. With more species of birds than any other country, Colombia has the potential to become the world's premier birdwatching destination. Audubon is working with Calidris, our BirdLife International partner, to cultivate bird-based tourism as a way of generating greater local commitment to bird conservation. We are currently supporting the establishment of a national network of birding trails that will use bird tourism as a tool for conservation and local economic development across 50 IBAs, 20 national parks, and 30 local communities.

These initiatives are different from many other ecotourism efforts because they are based locally. Audubon experts train local guides in bird identification and ecology, with the goal of certifying guides to eventually run tours themselves. In this way, birders directly support local people and communities, help preserve local biodiversity, and nurture an emerging ecotourism industry. To date we have established two trails, the Northern Colombia and Central Andes Birding trails, with two more expected to be completed in early 2020 (Read more about this project, including the results of the pilot phase, in our Birds Mean Business report.)

3. Climate-Change Adaptation: Several regions in Colombia are struggling with issues related to the impacts of climate change and ensuring water and food security. Via our climate partnership with BirdLife International, Audubon is providing capacity-building support, scientific expertise, and other resources to develop science-based climate adaptation plans. We are working to complete a national-level climate change analysis for Colombia ́s birds, develop an adaptation action plan, and launch monitoring and adaptation initiatives that will positively affect the protection, conservation, and climate resilience of IBAs and Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs).

4. Capacity-Building: Audubon is assisting Calidris, our BirdLife partner in Colombia, with fundraising, long-term strategic planning, advocacy and government relations, and other institutional areas. Throughout Latin American and the Caribbean, strong partnerships with local organizations are helping us to advance policies and practices that achieve conservation goals. These organizations have personal and strong ties to their governments and other constituents, and are able to deliver concrete, on-the-ground actions that address critical threats to Audubon’s priority bird species.

International Travel

Beyond the Coca Curtain: Can Birding Build an Economic Base in Colombia?

Colombia hosts more bird species than in any other country on the planet, but for years nobody dared to seek them. Now, with peace on the horizon, birders could offer a solution.
Audubon in Action

Colombia’s First Caribbean Birdwatching Trail Attracts Attention

The path aims to contribute with the conservation of endangered species and their habitats, while benefitting the locals financially.
International

Ecotourism in Colombia

Colombia has more species of birds than any other country and has the potential to become the world’s premier birdwatching destination.

International News

Greater Sage Grouse on Sagebrush Steppe.
Audubon Americas

Building Back Biodiversity

By National Audubon Society
May 19, 2023 — Celebrating the International Day of Biological Diversity 2023
White-throated Sparrow standing on a stump.
Boreal Forests

The Seal River Watershed Alliance and Audubon

By Jeff Wells, Audubon; Stephanie Thorassie, Seal River Watershed Alliance
April 24, 2023 — Listening to what birds tell us in order to protect the Boreal.
Male Surf Scoter floating.
Boreal Forests

The Original Winter Surfer

By Jeff Wells, Casey Arndt, Trina Bayard, Andrea Jones, and David Krause
April 17, 2023 — From the Pacific Coast to the Boreal Forest
Close-up of a Cape May Warbler.
Boreal Forests

Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition Examines the Importance of the Boreal Forest

April 12, 2023 — Press Release from the Smithsonian Institution
Common Tern with chicks.
Boreal Forests

The Common Tern

By Kara Fox, Don Lyons, and Jeff Wells.
April 04, 2023 — Connecting the Gulf of Mexico to the Boreal Forest
Audubon Americas

Why it is worth changing Colombia's productive landscapes

By Audubon Americas
March 27, 2023 — By working productive landscapes and connecting different ecosystems, we provide safe habitats for birds and biodiversity and achieve environmental benefits for people while improving the productivity and profitability of farmers and communities with a long-term sustainable impact.
Fox Sparrow sitting on a tree branch.
Boreal Forests

The Fox Sparrow

By Jeff Wells
March 20, 2023 — Celebrating this beloved sparrow on World Sparrow Day!
Seas & Shores

Mangroves, much more than meeting points of land and sea

By Julio Montes de Oca
March 08, 2023 — During the 8th Our Ocean Conference, Audubon Americas, and Conservation International showcased two leading projects in Panama and Colombia, supported by the UK-Blue Carbon Fund, and administered by the Inter-American Development Bank.
The Flyways

Chile prepares to include birds in its GDP

By Javiera Ferreyra
March 07, 2023 — Chile is a world destination for adventure and nature tourism. This line of the economy is growing and will soon reach higher levels thanks to the fact that birdwatching is on the rise in the country.
Rainbow over Pimachiowin Aki.
Boreal Forests

A Rainbow Over Pimachiowin Aki

By Chad Wilsey
March 07, 2023 — "The Land that Gives Life"