Photo: Graham Jenks/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Size: 
484.4 sq. mi.

Grand Teton National Park in northwestern Wyoming has a landscape defined by its 40-mile long Teton Range, including the Grand Teton, which has an elevation level of more than 13,000 feet. The park has various forest communities that include white bark and limber pine trees, as well as sub-alpine fir and blue spruce. Glaciers, rivers, lakes, ponds, and wetlands also contribute to Grand Teton’s dynamic plants and wildlife. Many year-round and migratory bird species can be spotted in the park, including the Calliope Hummingbird, Trumpeter Swan, Bald Eagle, Western Tanager, and Osprey.

  • summer
  • winter

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges or abundances. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

This Park in Context

The extent of turnover, potential colonization, and potential extirpation varies among the 53 national parks featured on this website. Below, see how this park compares to others in summer and winter. Click on a circle to explore results for another park.

  • summer
  • winter
American Golden-Plover. Photo: Milo Burcham

American Golden-Plover. Photo: Milo Burcham

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