Photo: Jonathan/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Size: 
1,046.9 sq. mi.

Kenai Fjords National Park, on the Kenai Peninsula in south-central Alaska, covers more than 500 miles of Pacific Ocean coastline. Its landscape is marked by icy waters, coastal fjords, spruce forests, mountains, glaciers, and icefields, such as the Harding Icefield—the largest in the United States. Many plants flourish here, including fireweed and mosses, and more than 190 migratory and resident bird species, such as the Bald Eagle, Black-billed Magpie, Black Oystercatcher, Peregrine Falcon, Steller’s Jay, and Horned and Tufted Puffins. Kenai Fjords National Park is recognized as an Important Bird Area.

  • summer
  • winter

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges or abundances. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

This Park in Context

The extent of turnover, potential colonization, and potential extirpation varies among the 53 national parks featured on this website. Below, see how this park compares to others in summer and winter. Click on a circle to explore results for another park.

  • summer
  • winter

American Goldfinch. Photo: Lynn Cleveland/Audubon Photography Awards