Photo: Justin Meissen/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Size: 
110.1 sq. mi.

Widely known for large mammals, such as bison, elk, and big-horned sheep, North Dakota’s Theodore Roosevelt National Park, boasts much broader biodiversity. The park can be broken down into four ecosystems—flood plains, forest, prairie/grassland, and rivers/streams—and each ecosystem hosts various birds based on the resources they provide during a particular season. Some birds call this park home year-round, such as Golden Eagles, White-breasted Nuthatches, and Great-horned Owls, which are typically found in the forested areas on the flood plain. In the spring and fall seasons, birds like White-throated Sparrows, Sandhill Cranes, and White Pelicans are found around the Little Missouri River.

  • summer
  • winter

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges or abundances. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

This Park in Context

The extent of turnover, potential colonization, and potential extirpation varies among the 53 national parks featured on this website. Below, see how this park compares to others in summer and winter. Click on a circle to explore results for another park.

  • summer
  • winter

Category: Amateur
Photographer: Ly Dang
Species: Osprey
Location: San Diego, CA
Story Behind the Shot: Dang staked out this Osprey’s nest on a typical San Diego “May grey” day, near the San Diego River Estuary, hoping to catch the female in a teaching moment with her chicks. He waited for more than an hour before he finally saw an Osprey returning from the direction of the river. She carried seaweed between her talons—a meal that seemed to catch the chicks by surprise.
Photo: Ly Dang