Photo: Neal Herbert/NPS

Size: 
2,735.5 sq. mi.

Located in northwest Alaska, Kobuk Valley was home to some of North America’s first inhabitants. The park’s landscape consists of the Baird and Waring Mountain Ranges and contains a 25-mile stretch of sand dunes famous for the biannual crossing of 250,000 caribou twice a year. Kobuk Valley National Park is home to 162 bird species, including the Tundra Swan, Arctic Tern, Northern Goshawk, and Harlequin Duck. The waterfowl who call the Valley home use the extensive wetlands as well as along the lakes’ and rivers’ banks as nesting grounds.

  • summer
  • winter

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges or abundances. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

This Park in Context

The extent of turnover, potential colonization, and potential extirpation varies among the 53 national parks featured on this website. Below, see how this park compares to others in summer and winter. Click on a circle to explore results for another park.

  • summer
  • winter

Golden-winged Warbler. Photo: Arni Stinnissen/Audubon Photography Awards

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