Photo: Michael Quinn/NPS

Size: 
1,902 sq. mi.

By 2050, visitors might find a novel combination of raptors soaring over Arizona's Grand Canyon National Park, a raptor corridor and global Important Bird Area. The White-tailed Kite, Gray Hawk, and Harris's Hawk may colonize the park. Golden and Bald Eagles, however, are expected to decline, with the latter possibly going locally extinct. The park’s pinyon and ponderosa forests could also be stressed by warming and drying conditions, threatening specialist birds like the Pinyon Jay and Pygmy Nuthatch. Much will depend on the continued flows of the Colorado River, where Bald Eagles congregate and hunt, and how that waterway continues to be managed.

  • summer
  • winter

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges or abundances. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

This Park in Context

The extent of turnover, potential colonization, and potential extirpation varies among the 53 national parks featured on this website. Below, see how this park compares to others in summer and winter. Click on a circle to explore results for another park.

  • summer
  • winter

Golden-winged Warbler. Photo: Arni Stinnissen/Audubon Photography Awards

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