Photo: Inga Spence/Alamy

Size: 
217.2 sq. mi.

Redwood National Park is known for having some of the tallest trees in the world, but it also features oak woodlands, riverways, and coastlines that support a diverse suite of birds. As the park’s climate changes, many of the birds that we commonly see here are likely to fight suitable climate, such as the Great-Horned Owls and other owl species. But the warming climate will likely challenge other birds, including many warbler species that occur in the park, including Nashville, MacGillivray’s, Yellow-rumped, and Townsends Warblers. The park’s climate is projected to worsen for woodpecker species also, including Acorn, Red-bellied Sapsucker, Downy, and Hairy. It is recommended that managers help these and other species by emphasizing habitat restoration and reducing other stressors.

  • summer
  • winter

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges or abundances. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

This Park in Context

The extent of turnover, potential colonization, and potential extirpation varies among the 53 national parks featured on this website. Below, see how this park compares to others in summer and winter. Click on a circle to explore results for another park.

  • summer
  • winter

American Goldfinch. Photo: Lynn Cleveland/Audubon Photography Awards