Size: 
378 sq. mi.

At Capitol Reef National Park in south-central Utah, willow thickets and cottonwood forests are juxtaposed against tall canyon walls and expanses of barren red rock. By 2050, this park’s winter climate might become suitable for 57 bird species like the Vermilion Flycatcher, Western Bluebird, and Violet-green Swallow, some of which could begin overwintering in the park. The same climatic changes might cause the extirpation of 20 species in summer, including the American Goldfinch and Tree Swallow. Within Capitol Reef, the Fremont River is an Important Bird Area and a lush oasis in an otherwise arid landscape. It is recommended that managers focus on this area for conservation efforts.

  • summer
  • winter

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges or abundances. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.