Photo: Hannah Schwalbe/NPS

Size: 
1,235.4 sq. mi.

Located in the intersection of two distinct desert ecosystems, Joshua Tree National Park serves as a vital migratory stop for birds transiting inland along the Pacific Flyway. Its seeps, springs, and streams are highly important for a wide variety of songbirds, raptors, and waterbirds passing through. The park’s climate will likely grow less suitable for Golden Eagles and other raptors, as well as the iconic Greater Roadrunner. However, other species such as Phainopepla, Cactus Wren, and Verdin appear poised to find a local climate that’s stable or improving for them. In order to retain the park’s vibrant bird population, it is recommended that land managers look to maximizing the water habitat on the park, reducing disturbance, and maintaining as much native plant opportunities as possible.

  • summer
  • winter

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges or abundances. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

This Park in Context

The extent of turnover, potential colonization, and potential extirpation varies among the 53 national parks featured on this website. Below, see how this park compares to others in summer and winter. Click on a circle to explore results for another park.

  • summer
  • winter

American Goldfinch. Photo: Lynn Cleveland/Audubon Photography Awards