Photo: Jonathan Eden/Alamy

Size: 
41.6 sq. mi.

Born of volcanic action, California’s Pinnacles National Park is a unique landscape that remains highly adaptable to a warming climate. While the winter rains that feed the park’s chaparral and streamside vegetation may ebb, the park’s climate may remain suitable for a large part of the park’s birds. This includes the park’s most well-known species, the endangered California Condor. Other species that might continue to find suitable climate include the Peregrine Falcon, Red-tailed Hawk, and Turkey Vulture. Other popular park species—such as the California Quail and Western Tanager—may struggle to find suitable climate in the increasingly dry conditions. It is recommended that managers at the park help these species by supporting native habitat and maximizing the value of water habitat.

  • summer
  • winter

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges or abundances. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

This Park in Context

The extent of turnover, potential colonization, and potential extirpation varies among the 53 national parks featured on this website. Below, see how this park compares to others in summer and winter. Click on a circle to explore results for another park.

  • summer
  • winter

Category: Amateur
Photographer: Ly Dang
Species: Osprey
Location: San Diego, CA
Story Behind the Shot: Dang staked out this Osprey’s nest on a typical San Diego “May grey” day, near the San Diego River Estuary, hoping to catch the female in a teaching moment with her chicks. He waited for more than an hour before he finally saw an Osprey returning from the direction of the river. She carried seaweed between her talons—a meal that seemed to catch the chicks by surprise.
Photo: Ly Dang