Photo: Jacob W. Frank/NPS

Size: 
3,468.4 sq. mi.

Yellowstone National Park is currently home to a plethora of songbird species that nest on willows growing alongside western rivers. Suitable climate is projected to persist for several of these riparian songbirds, such as the Yellow Warbler, Song Sparrow, and Willow Flycatcher, a priority species for the park. But it may grow too dry and hot for others, such as Wilson’s Warbler, Warbling Vireo, and Lincoln’s Sparrow. Because these species are willow-dependent, park managers can continue to protect natural systems—including supporting large carnivores and beavers, both of which promote healthy streamside willows beneficial to riparian songbirds.

  • summer
  • winter

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges or abundances. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

Suitable climate for these species is currently available in the park. This list is derived from National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring data and eBird observations. Note, however, there are still imperfections in these datasets.

These are species that may find the new climate conditions of this park suitable by 2050. But projected changes in climate suitability are not definitive predictions of future species ranges. Numerous other factors affect where species occur, including habitat quality, food abundance, species adaptability, and the availability of microclimates.

Within this park, suitable climate for these birds ceases to occur by 2050. Species may either adapt to the park’s new climate or may follow suitable climate elsewhere.

This Park in Context

The extent of turnover, potential colonization, and potential extirpation varies among the 53 national parks featured on this website. Below, see how this park compares to others in summer and winter. Click on a circle to explore results for another park.

  • summer
  • winter
American Golden-Plover. Photo: Milo Burcham

American Golden-Plover. Photo: Milo Burcham

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